Storytelling

Video Book Trailer #3: The Philosophy of Storytelling

So why should we teach through story? We live a culture saturated by stories. We all live unique stories. In an environment where polarizing rhetoric often tears apart the unifying stories of humanity, teaching through story has the ability to transcend the rhetoric and invite others into God’s Story. Further, storytelling creates a medium for students to not simply hear a message, but to imagine themselves as part of the story

My book is currently available in Kindle form on Amazon.com.

It releases in paperback next month and is available for pre-order in the Youth Specialities Store.

As I continue to walk faithfully forward in writing, I feel called to serve the global Church and give a voice to the stories that are often forgotten.  It is a clear reality that I can’t be faithful in sharing and advocating through my writing without the support of others.  I need your partnership.

Here are two very simple ways:

1. Click here to “Like” my Facebook “Jon Huckins Writing” page.  This platform will focus solely on my writing.

2. Share this blog and/or share the book trailer video. Here is a link to the YouTube Channel with all the videos.

 

The Science of Storytelling

Storytelling open book

Teaching through the art of storytelling creates a medium for the listening mind to activate in a linear, flowing manner. Before I go on, I must offer that every brain is created and works differently. As such, I’ll speak to general trends and information on the brain and its workings in relation to learning. (Also, I’ll refer to the brain as the “mind,” as it’s more appropriate for our conversation.)

Listening is central to the growth and development of most human beings. Studies show that 85 percent of what we know we’ve learned through listening (Shorpe). Yet we only remember 20 percent of what we hear and 75 percent of the time we’re distracted, preoccupied, or forgetful (Hunsaker). So, we understand that listening is really important, but it can be a highly inefficient way to transfer information depending on the mode of communication. Some argue that offering convincing statistics engages the listener and creates lasting impact, but studies also tell us that people quickly dismiss statistics that are inconsistent with their beliefs (Graesser).

But fictional stories—which can be processed very efficiently with minimal effort and high recall—offer “suspension of disbelief,” which can lead to tangible change (Bower & Graesser). For this reason, some in the medical field have implemented storytelling as a mode of healthcare communication, bringing attention to issues such as suicide to AIDS prevention.

So we’re left with story—the telling of which can break down walls of cynicism and mental distraction and lead listeners toward engagement. The art is in assimilating fiction into belief, which why intentional dialog and discussion is pivotal to its success.

The above is a brief excerpt from my book Teaching Through the Art of Storytelling. Also available to pre-order in paperback at youthspecialties.com.

 

Book Trailer #1: Why I Wrote Teaching Through the Art of Storytelling

This is the first in a series of four book trailers put together by my friends Jon Hall and Peter Schrock.  Not only is the world filled with dynamic stories, the Scriptures tell God’s Story. Our role is to invite others into the Story and one powerful way to communicate such an invitation is through the art of storytelling.

My book is currently available in Kindle form on Amazon.com.

It releases in paperback next month and is available for pre-order in the Youth Specialities Store.

As I continue to walk faithfully forward in writing, I feel called to serve the global Church and give a voice to the stories that are often forgotten.  It is a clear reality that I can’t be faithful in sharing and advocating through my writing without the support of others.  I need your partnership.

Here are two very simple ways:

1. Click here to “Like” my Facebook “Jon Huckins Writing” page.  This platform will focus solely on my writing.

2. Share this blog and/or share the book trailer video. Here is a link to the YouTube Channel with all the videos.

 

Sharing a Story

Well, it’s coming down to the wire as Teaching Through the Art of Storytelling will be released next week on December 14th!  It has been a long road (almost 3 years) and I’m looking forward to the ways it will challenge/encourage communicators and invite others into the masterful Story of God.

In the book, I challenge communicators (specifically youth pastors) to consider teaching through storytelling; a mode of communication usually employed only as an illustration to the message that is taught in a 3 point prepositional format.  I propose that through the development of artful modern day parables (also known as Jewish Agada), the telling of a story is not simply illustrating the message; instead it actually becomes the message.  Through the development of characters, plot and setting, we can articulate deep theological and practical insights by simply telling a story.  Not only is storytelling neurologically easier to follow than other forms of verbal communication, it creates a “suspension of belief” that allows the listener to imagine themselves as characters within the story.

All that being said, the last section of my book contains stories that I have written over the years and told in a variety of teaching contexts.  I am offering them as a resource and working example of what teaching through storytelling might look like.

So, for the next week I will set aside my usual blogging and simply tell you a story.  It is one of the stories that has been published in the book and you are more than welcome to use it and try it out in your context.  I wrote it to an audience of teenagers and it centers on Matt. 5:38-48 with it’s major themes being: redemptive violence, injustice, forgiveness, reconciliation and restoration.  Finally, the story is told through two main characters named Kevin and Charlie.

I will post the first section tomorrow.  Follow along and enjoy some storytime!

1 2 Scroll to top